Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

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Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca-Falls-New-York

Seneca Falls

 

It was another hot day for kayakers to seek cooler temps on the water.  The parking lot was pretty empty.  The Community Center was locked, so one had to hike to find a rest room. We launched and paddled under the Bedford Falls Bridge with its bells ready for the next “It’s a Wonderful Life” celebration. We passed the waterfront businesses lined with boats from as far away as Texas, and passed by the historic Trinity Church built in 1886 and saved from being devoured by the canal constructors.  The falls, which inspired the Seneca Falls name, were submerged below us in the Cayuga-Seneca Canal. We entered double locks.  The first was Lock 3.  The sides and ropes were lined with weeds, algae, and zebra mussels. Cindy was glad she brought a glove for her hanging-on hand.  After dropping down, the door to Lock 2 opened with a loud eerie creek and slammed shut.  Lock 2 was surprisingly clear of greenery and mussels. Each lock lowered us 24.5 feet.  Seagulls watched from the edges, and an osprey eyed his surroundings from on top of a telephone pole. Herons few from one side to the other. A small bright red tree reminded us that autumn was near.

The canal had very few boats today. Trees lined the canal until we passed under the Route 89 Bridge.  Then dwellings in all sorts of weathered conditions lined the southern shore. Two juvenile eagles sat in bare trees as we neared our break area past some new duck blinds by Lock 1 on Cayuga Lake.  An osprey fed his hungry peeps in a nest atop a pole.  Cormorants hung out with seagulls on the wires. Turtles and geese hung out near the water.  A few anglers snagged some fish.

We had company in the locks on the way back – just one boat.  Back at the launch we loaded kayaks then hiked up the hill to Avicollis. Their tasty Italian food did not disappoint, especially those complementary garlic knots.  It was a nice paddle and even nicer to see some paddlers we have not seen in a while.  Dave G with his wonderful laugh joined us. Sandra and Emma Lou traveled from Ithaca.  Sue, Eric, Cindy MP, Dave L, and Kim traveled from points east.  We didn’t make it 15 miles on the canal as the lyrics say, but a nice 10.

Low bridge everybody down

Low bridge for we’re coming to town

And you’ll always know your neighbor

And you’ll always know your pal

If you’ve ever navigated on the Erie Canal

-Kim