Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney-Bluffs-New-York

Chimney Bluff

 

We gathered at Chimney Bluffs State Park, took a look at the waves and decided that Lake Ontario looked paddleable.  Down the road, the launch into East Bay was murky, green, and greener for a few 100 feet. We were pleased that it was not blue-green algae, nor being treated with chemicals like the last time we paddled here in 2014. The swan families seemed quite content to raise their cygnets in this bay.  The babies were as big as their parents safeguarding them. There were 3 cygnets in each family.  

The short channel from East Bay to Ontario was open, we did not need to portage this year.  The transition was rough.  There were no white caps, but we rocked and rolled until we rounded the bend near the bluffs. One group decided to paddle around the bay.  A second group paddled to the high cliffs. The houses on those high cliffs have quite a view.  The third group paddled on to the bluffs.  

The bluffs were beautiful.  We noted the erosion. I added a picture from 2014 for comparison.  Some of the drumlins are no longer there and several large rocks rest on the shoreline.  We took our break just past the bluffs. A dip in the water was refreshing.  The shore was filled with smooth round pebbles.  You could walk barefoot with no problem. I read an article that said there are hundreds of types of stones here.  The glaciers carried them from Canada and the Great Lakes region over thousands of years.  

The paddle back was a bit easier facing the NE wind. Going through the channel was like moving on a lazy river.  The watchful herons were still on guard. The turtles stretched their necks to get a view. I wonder if they knew how camouflaged they were in the green soup.

With all groups safely back at the launch, we headed off to Skippers Landing on Sodus Bay.  The food was delicious.  How delicious?  Eric said it was the best chicken parmesan he has eaten.  You all know he is THE connoisseur of that entrée.

Those who paddled and appreciated the Great Lake breeze on another hot 80-plus degree day were:  John, Mike M, Eric, Fish, Sue, Kim and visiting paddlers Michelle and Michael (in tandem) and daughters Mackenzie and Allyssa.  Tandem kayaks can be pretty fast when you are in sync like Michelle and Mike.  It was nice paddling with you all.  Safe travels.

-Kim